A Recap of the First ESP Shows with New Safety Protocols

What to expect at ESP June Show Series

Wellington, FL – June 1, 2020 – The first two weeks of schooling shows at Equestrian Village have wrapped up, after a successful reopening of the facility following the COVID-19 closures in mid-March. While the situation continues to evolve daily, the ESP staff was hard at work to ensure the safety of all its exhibitors, trainers, and staff during competition. New protocols were put into place, including specific points of entry complete with thermal scanners, an online system for show entries, and social distancing across the grounds.

A total of fifteen security guards, five dedicated cleaning personnel, two paramedics, and two Palm Beach County fire rescue crew members were stationed at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center to assist with these protocols. Another fifty-six ESP staff members were on-site to operate the competition and oversee social distancing. Approximately seven gallons of hand sanitizer, one thousand pairs of gloves, and six hundred masks were utilized over the past two weeks.

Although public sentiment for attending public events varies across the country, the first two weeks of ESP competition showed that equestrians are ready to get back in the show ring. During the May Schooling I Show (May 22-24), a total of 412 horses were entered, while Schooling II (May 29-31) had 473 horses compete. Entries are expected to rise for the upcoming June Show Series, which will feature Equitation Days, USEF “A” National, and Jumper 4* level competition. CLICK HERE to view the ESP June Spring Series Prize List.

“Overall, everyone was very respectful of our new policies and obeyed the rules for wearing masks and staying 6 feet apart,” stated David Burton Jr., Show Manager and COO of Equestrian Sport Productions. “I think everyone was just happy to be back and showing again and returning to some sort of ‘normal’. However, it’s very important that all exhibitors continue to help us with these protocols so we can continue operating.”

Here’s what to expect if you are planning to compete at PBIEC in the coming weeks:

  • Come prepared with your own face mask and gloves. If you forget yours, packs of both are available for purchase in the show office for $10, with proceeds going to charity.
  • Enter the show grounds at Checkpoint D for thermal camera detection.
  • All ESP Staff will be wearing yellow vests, reminding you to stay 6 feet apart and wear your mask properly (covering nose and mouth).
  • Mounted riders do not need to have a mask on, but must wear one as soon as they dismount.
  • Hand sanitizing stations and newly installed temporary sinks have been placed around the grounds for continued cleansing.
  • Refrigerators with free, individual water bottles have been placed by each arena for exhibitors.
  • Prepare to stand in designated positions when entering the show office and only entering when capacity is under 6 people.
  • Only 2 people are allowed at each jump in the warmup ring (one person per jump standard).
  • Course maps are uploaded online HERE the night before competition to reduce congregating by the in-gates.
  • Live streaming will be available HERE for each arena so friends and family can safely watch from home.
  • For a full list of all safety protocols, CLICK HERE.

Trainers – As we prepare for larger entry numbers and on-site stabling to be at full capacity, please remember that it is YOUR responsibility to uphold the safety protocols within the barns at PBIEC. This area is very difficult for ESP Staff to monitor, so we need you to maintain your barn area to the same standards that ESP is applying to the rest of the show grounds. One picture of incorrect behavior in the barns could be catastrophic for the whole sport.

Equestrian Sport Productions is also working on ways to keep its competitors updated in real time while on-site, with a new texting service. Those who opt-in will receive texts regarding impending weather alerts, safety reminders, links to course maps, and more. To learn more, CLICK HERE.

Remember, the only people allowed on-site are the following:

  • ESP Staff & Officials
  • Essential Personnel (Vets, Farriers, etc. actively treating horses on the grounds)
  • Trainers (that have exhibitors competing today)
  • Grooms (that have clients competing today)
  • Riders (that are competing today)
  • One Guest per Rider (One family member or one friend of the rider)

As entry numbers grow in June, it is essential to our industry’s continuation that everyone follow these rules to control our numbers and ensure social distancing and safety protocols during the COVID-19 pandemic. Please do not enter the grounds if you are not allowed. We look forward to welcoming you all back when it is safe to do so. Thank you for your understanding and cooperation.

For more information, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

Motivation from Moshi, by Jane Savoie

I stepped on a little rock yesterday and bruised my foot. Ouch! It didn’t hurt for very long, but it made me grumpy. Then I got bit on the neck by a big fly. It hurt! I snapped at it and bumped my nose on the fence. I was having a really bad day.

I stood in the corner of my turnout feeling agitated and unhappy. Then I remembered Jane saying that attitude is a choice. I could choose to be grumpy, or choose to be happy. But I was so grumpy that I was having a hard time finding even a hint of “happy” in my mind. I was stuck.

Then Indy stopped by to say hello. He looked up at me with that funny, fuzzy face and grinned. One look at his big, smiling mug and I suddenly found that little tickle of happiness swell in my mind. I thought of all the times we’d played chase and the way he’d laugh with his funny dog laugh as we raced around my turnout. I remembered watching him jump sideways when he spotted the little alligator in the grass and the joyful way he splashed in the pond while chasing a ball.

Within minutes I was feeling happy and content. All it took was changing my focus! I concentrated on the thoughts that made me feel good inside, and that good feeling spread to my outside. By the time Jane had me tacked up and ready to ride, I was feeling terrific! It was a great day.

Do you realize that your attitude is a choice? It does take some effort sometimes, but you can change a bad day into a terrific day just by deciding to concentrate on the good stuff. And there is always good stuff if you look for it. If you have trouble finding it, just take a good look into your dog’s sweet face. I’ll bet that tickles the “happy” in you!

Love, Moshi

Jane Savoie
1174 Hill St ext.
Berlin, VT 05602
Jane’s Website
DressageMentor.com

Important Information Regarding the Kentucky Summer Classic

Lexington, Ky. – June 1, 2020 – Due to the number of entries already received for the Kentucky Summer Classic, July 28 – August 2, the supply of stalls has been exhausted and at this time we will no longer be able to accept stall requests for that show. Any stall requests received after May 30, 2020 will be placed on a WAIT LIST. Exhibitors on the WAIT LIST will be notified should stalls become available. Published below is the Revised Entry Policy for the Kentucky Summer Classic.

For questions or further information, please contact Colleen Morrissey at (859) 300-9899 or colleen@kentuckyhorseshows.com

REVISED ENTRY POLICY

Entry blanks will be accepted ONLY when signed by the owner, rider, or handler AND trainer. They must be accompanied by a check or credit card authorization for stabling fees. Post entries will be accepted as noted above; however, no stall will be reserved unless stall fees are paid by the closing of entries.

Please note that in the event the supply of stalls is exhausted, preference will be given to those exhibitors who are showing at both shows. Additionally, at the Kentucky Summer Classic, 125 stalls will be set aside for those competitors who have entered the USHJA pony hunter derby finals – east coast by the closing date of entries (June 23). The remaining available stalls will be assigned on a “first come, first served” basis. Once the supply of stalls is exhausted, additional stabling requests will be placed on a wait list and the affected exhibitors will be notified.

Stalls may be reserved only by submission of completed entry forms along with payment. No reservations by telephone. Management reserves the right to charge a non-showing fee of $100 to any horse not accumulating entry fees of $100.

Happy Birthday to a Legend

On May 29th, 1995, a pale palomino colt tottered out of the woods right in front of filmmaker Ginger Kathrens’ camera. The rest is history.

Ginger followed the colt, whom she named Cloud, through the seasons of his life. Cloud became a force to be reckoned with in his wild Pryor Mountain home. He was a fighter, and fiercely protective of his family. At the Cloud Foundation, we proudly carry on his legacy.

Watch Ginger’s short video tribute to Cloud the Legend on what would be his 25th birthday.

The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Breeches.com Delivers Memorial Day Campaign Food to Medical Workers

Wellington Regional Medical Center leadership unload food for their busy workers. Photo by EQ Media.

WELLINGTON, Fla. – May 29, 2020 – Timmy Sharma, owner of breeches.com, arrived at Wellington Regional Medical Center on the morning of May 28, bearing a truckload of groceries. He was met by Chief Executive Officer Pam Tahan, Chief Medical Officer Dr. Richard Hays, and the key leadership of the hospital who helped unload the food destined Wellington Regional Medical Center’s Grab-n-Go Pantry. Established by members of the Wellington community, the Grab-n-Go Pantry alleviates the burden of grocery store shopping for busy hospital personnel during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The pantry is a repository for donated goods, including food and household necessities. Many workers end their shifts after grocery stores with shortened hours are closed and the Grab-n-Go Pantry helps keep their families supplied.

Sharma and his wife and partner Laurie wanted to do something special for their Memorial Day Campaign. Typically, Memorial Day is reserved for honoring and remembering armed service members who risked and gave their lives to protect the freedom of U.S. citizens. This Memorial Day, the Sharmas and their breeches.com also decided to honor medical workers fighting the COVID-19 battle.

“We wanted to do something to help those working on the front lines,” Sharma said. “We are all part of the equestrian community in Wellington. So many of us have been at this hospital. We wanted to show the staff how much they are appreciated. They’re doing such an amazing job, working long hours and giving of themselves.”

During the breeches.com campaign, each purchaser received a 15% off coupon on their entire order. Breeches.com matched the discount and created a fund for an equal value donation. Around $3,000 was raised to purchase food from the Wellington Costco store and delivered to Wellington Regional Medical Center.

“Thank you so much for your generous donation,” Tahan said. “This is such a great help to our personnel and their families.”

FEI Publishes Return to Play Policy as Equestrian Adapts to “New Normal”

The FEI has published its Policy for Enhanced Competition Safety during the Covid-19 pandemic, aimed at assisting Organisers and National Federations with the safe resumption of international equestrian events in line with national and local restrictions.

The Policy will apply to all FEI Events held as of 1 July 2020 and has been put in place to limit the risk of transmission and further spread of Covid-19 until an effective treatment and/or vaccine as determined by the World Health Organization (WHO) are available.

Developed by FEI Medical Committee Chair Dr Mark Hart together with FEI Headquarters, the Policy requires National Federations and Organisers to carry out a Risk Assessment to evaluate whether it is safe to hold their Events. The Policy includes general best practice recommendations for Organisers and is to be implemented in conjunction with any requirements imposed by the domestic authorities. In addition, discipline-specific guidance will be issued shortly by the FEI.

It is mandatory for FEI Event Organisers to conduct the risk assessment together with their National Federation and domestic government and public health authorities. Events for which the FEI has not received the completed risk assessment and mitigation measures plan will be removed from the FEI Calendar.

“Covid-19 has caused massive disruption to the FEI Calendar and to national events, with a huge impact on all the various participants of equestrian sports,” Dr Mark Hart said. “We are all in this together and this pandemic will be with us for at least 12-24 months. We need to adapt to a ‘new normal’ as we move forward.

“The FEI is committed to assisting National Federations and FEI Event Organisers by providing resources to effectively assess the risks potentially posed by Events from the planning phase and mitigate such risks through relevant measures.

“As we anticipate the gradual return of competitions, we must do everything we can to mitigate the risk of transmission and further spread of Covid-19. This is a matter of public health, and it’s also how a sport can demonstrate to public authorities that it is ready to resume activity.”

Media contacts:

Grania Willis
Director, Communications
grania.willis@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 42

Vanessa Martin Randin
Senior Manager, Media Relations & Communications
vanessa.randin@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 73

Congress Must Pass Great American Outdoors Act

As the states move to re-open public lands, Congress has a major opportunity to pass important trails legislation that will get Americans outside while promoting the health of recreational riders and other outdoor enthusiasts.  Thanks in large part to continued advocacy from the horse industry, a bipartisan group of senators has sponsored the “Great American Outdoors Act of 2020” (S. 3422).  This important recreation bill will come up for a vote in June.   Please contact your senators today!

American Horse Council
www.horsecouncil.org

Dressage4Kids Tips, by Lendon Gray

I taught my first lessons in a month recently and the lesson I found myself repeating often, and I hear other instructors repeating a lot, is the importance of the outside rein. This is a huge subject, but in brief… The concept of inside leg to outside rein is mega important. BUT that doesn’t mean one hangs on the outside rein or allows the horse to lean on the outside rein. If you were to give the outside so it goes loose for a stride, nothing should fall apart. On the other side is the importance of the use of the outside rein in general. The inside rein is generally the suppling rein as needed and also turns the horse’s head and neck. But the outside rein connects the horse’s body to his neck. (Many of you have been in the situation of trying to turn the horse where he doesn’t want to go and you pull his head practically to your knee and the horse continues to go in the opposite direction – just because his head turns doesn’t mean his body goes in the same direction.) So your most important turning aids are the outside rein and leg and the most important bending aids are the inside rein and leg. This is mega important on circles and corners to ensure that when you are bending the horse his shoulder doesn’t fall out.

Excerpt from Cavalletti for Dressage and Jumping (4th edition) by Ingrid and Reiner Klimke

Thank you to Martha Cook and Trafalgar Square Book for providing the below excerpt!

Cavalletti for Dressage and Jumping (4th edition) is available at Trafalgar Square Books.  D4K friends can use the code D4K2020 and receive 25% off.

Cavalletti Work on Circles

Riding over cavalletti on circles and half circles makes a welcome change for young riders. The horse should already have a sound basic training and be used to working over cavalletti on straight lines. When working on both straight and curved lines, the horse must be straight. This means the hind feet must follow the tracks of the front feet. On circles, the horse is not straight if he makes the common fault of lifting his hind legs and moving them out to the side rather than stepping forward under the center of gravity. In order to avoid this, he must be flexed to the inside.

Cavalletti work on circles and half circles helps to loosen the horse, and can rectify stiffness on one side or the other, so the horse bends and flexes equally in both directions. If a horse is not straight, he will often lose rhythm – this is where cavalletti work can help by restoring elasticity and encouraging the placing of the hind feet under the center of gravity.

Over poles, the horse does not have the chance to step out to the side with the hind legs. The length of stride and pacing of the feet is so precise that the horse maintains his rhythm by himself. It takes very little practice before the hind feet step into the tracks of the front feet.

A figure of eight works the horse equally on both reins. Each circle requires four cavalletti set in a fan near the short side of the school. It is important to leave the track free so you can ride around the whole school on the track. In trot, this exercise is known as “changing direction through the circle.” It is not as useful in walk as it is in trot, but it is best to ride it in walk to start with, and you can revert to walk if you have problems.

Riding over cavalletti on circles is especially beneficial for training the horse’s inside hind leg to take weight. Because of this it can be quite strenuous, so avoid doing it for too long. Always tailor schooling sessions to the stage of training the horse has reached.

Dressage4Kids | graydressage@gmail.com | dressage4kidsorg.presencehost.net

Equestrians Helping Equestrians: Relief Efforts in the Wake of COVID-19

Once a week, the American Saddlebred Horse Association (ASHA) shares a school-horse appreciation post on social media for what they’ve dubbed “Feed Your Favorite Lesson Horse Friday.” There’s also “Tip Your Groom Tuesday” and “Support a Horse Show Super Hero Sunday,” which are all designed to encourage equestrians to give money to support lesson programs and horse show support staff. While spring would typically be a busy time of year for the equine industry, this year is different, and people in the horse world have come up with creative ways to support each other.

“The Joint Leadership Council (JLC) comprises members from the leadership at the American Hackney Horse Society, American Morgan Horse Association, American Road Horse & Pony Association, American Saddlebred Horse Association, and United Professional Horsemen’s Association,” says Jessica Cushing, Marketing and Communications Manager for the ASHA. “The inspiration behind the JLC COVID-19 social media campaign was to be a voice and consistent promotional message for the difficulties many of our barns, professionals, and equine industry contractors in our community would be facing without the ability to give lessons and attend shows.”

The JLC’s social media campaign has been running for nine weeks, and Cushing says every post continues to receive positive engagement from the community.

“Our professionals are thankful for the recognition that business is still not back to normal, and there are a great many still in need,” says Cushing. “The ability to help spread the word that people are in need has seen countless success stories of lesson horses being sponsored, grooms getting extra support, and a great ‘pay it forward’ lunch program that emerged amongst barns.”

Other segments of the equine industry have launched similar initiatives during the pandemic shutdown. To help keep school horses fed during their furlough, the United States Hunter Jumper Association launched a Feed Aid Initiative to help USHJA members obtain free or discounted feed for lesson horses. Applications are being accepted now through June 1.

Monetary donations to the USHJA’s Feed Aid Initiative are tax-deductible and will be matched by the USHJA Foundation up to $300,000.

The PonyApp and Connolly’s Red Mills have also teamed up to give away feed to lesson barns this spring. Nominations of barns and programs in need are accepted now at ponygroceries.theponyapp.com.

Rescue Relief

In times of hardship, horse owners may find it increasingly difficult financially to maintain an ideal level of care for their horses. Fortunately, the equestrian community has built safety nets to help horses and their owners when hard times hit.

Equine rescue operations are often pushed to their limits in an economic downturn due to owners who can no longer afford to keep their horses and a market with more horses than potential buyers. Most equine rescues operate on a local basis, taking in horses and facilitating adoptions within a certain geographic area. National programs help support those organizations.

The EQUUS Foundation offers financial support to equine organizations that are part of its Guardians program. These organizations are put through a rigorous vetting process every year to ensure high standards of horse care and transparent and accountable operations.

“For horses to remain an important part of American life and have a viable future, we need to ensure that donor dollars are being spent on programs with the greatest impact,” says Lynn Coakley, President of the EQUUS Foundation.

EQUUS Foundation Guardian Charities include those that provide shelter and rehabilitation for abused, neglected, and at-risk horses; retraining and rehoming for horses in transition; peaceful and humane retirement options for aged equines; and/or are organizations that provide equine-assisted therapies and activities in a way that is beneficial for horses and humans.

Coakley says that many of their Guardian charities have had to cancel fundraising events and close their doors to volunteers, which creates an immediate need for resources.

“Instead of waiting until the end of our fiscal year in August, the Board of Directors approved the immediate allocation of $100,000 to help ease the stress of EQUUS Foundation Guardian charities,” says Coakley. “Each eligible charity will receive a $500 grant for horse-care costs upon approval of its 2020 EQUUS Foundation Guardian Seal. As of today, we have awarded grants to over 67 charities and expect to reach at least 150 charities by June.”

“Rescues have had to cancel or postpone fundraising events for the foreseeable future, and many of them have experienced a severe decline in online donations since COVID-19 [closures] started in March,” says Cheryl Jacobson, Deputy Director of Equine Protection for the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). “While many rescues have hay, feed, and funds for several months, some rescues are not as fortunate and need help to feed their equines while they find additional avenues for fundraising.”

HSUS awards grants to non-profit rescue organizations across the country. In order to qualify for an HSUS grant, organizations must be accredited or verified by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries, be members of the Homes for Horses Coalition, or have been directly vetted by HSUS.

“HSUS contacted 440 Homes for Horses Coalition members in early March,” says Jacobson. “We collected information on whether they are open or closed to the public, how many equines they have on site and in foster homes, how long they have feed, hay, and meds for, and any other information they could provide us with. We noted which rescues mentioned that they were in dire need of emergency hay funds. As we were able to secure funding, we started providing grants to the rescues in dire need, and the amount was based on the number of equines in their care.”

Jacobson explains that grant applications are sent to rescues as more funding becomes available. As of this writing, HSUS’s Equine Protection Program and the Homes for Horses Coalition have awarded grant funds to 33 rescues. HSUS has provided additional grant money through its main COVID-19 grant budget.

US Equestrian has provided a USEF Disaster Relief Fund grant to support both the Equus Foundation Guardian Charities and HSUS’s Equine Protection Program to help horses in need due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Help for Horse People

  • Equine safety-net programs offer direct financial support to owners who need short-term assistance to keep their animals, thereby helping to keep horses from entering the rescue system. The Homes for Horses Coalition maintains a searchable list of safety net programs by state that assist owners with emergency funds, feed, veterinary care, or other essential expenses. The United Horse Coalition also provides a comprehensive listing of local and national equine relief programs on its website.
  • The Equestrian Aid Foundation is currently assisting equestrian professionals and service providers through its Disaster Relief Fund. Individuals who make their living through the horse industry and have lost their income as a direct result of the pandemic can apply for a one-time emergency grant payment of $500 to assist with basic living expenses.
  • In addition to its ongoing social media campaigns, the JLC is providing funds to horse trainers, riding instructors, and horse show staff in the trotting breed industry who have lost income due to COVID-19 through its Horsemen’s Relief Fund. At jlccares.com, equine industry professionals can find resources for financial assistance and creative solutions for generating income during the shutdown.
  • The Show Jumping Relief Fund was created to provide immediate financial assistance to horse show staff, including ring crew, grooms, braiders, and officials, who have lost income as a result of COVID-19 closures. Information on how to apply for assistance or donate to the fund is available at wixsite.com/home.

Get Involved

For equestrians who are able to give back during this time, there are several ways to help.

If you have room in your barn, consider adopting or fostering a horse in need. This will help free up space and resources at a local rescue. One place to start is MyRightHorse.org, a search engine established by The Right Horse initiative that helps connect available horses of all ages, breeds, and types with prospective adopters across the country. Fostering an adoptable horse will not only help ease the burden on rescue organizations, but will give that horse more one-on-one attention and human interaction to improve their adoptability.

In addition to accepting direct donations for the Disaster Relief Fund, the Equestrian Aid Foundation has also partnered with other organizations that are donating partial proceeds from goods and services to the Fund. Find the current partnerships at www.equestrianaidfoundation.org/community-initiatives-ways-to-help.

If you are able, contributing financially to a reputable organization can help bring some immediate financial relief.

“Thanks to a generous challenge gift from an anonymous donor, every $1 you donate now becomes $2 — up to a maximum of $25,000 — to help feed and care for horses at our Guardian charities during the COVID-19 pandemic,” says EQUUS Foundation President Coakley. “Every gift goes directly to underwrite actual horse-care costs like feed, bedding, veterinary, dental, and farrier care.”

The matching donation challenge applies to donations made now through June 30. Visit www.equusfoundation.org/give to donate.

“In addition, while the many barns and equine organizations we support had to temporarily close their doors to volunteers due to social-distancing requirements, many are now beginning to reopen with precautions in place,” says Coakley. “Volunteers are the lifeblood of many equine organizations, and volunteering is a great way to learn about and be close to horses and nature while giving back, making friends, and staying in shape! Learn more about our Champions Volunteer Incentive Program sponsored by Ariat International at www.equusfoundation.org/champions.”

There are always opportunities to provide assistance and give back to the equestrian community, whether that’s by contributing to the barns and shows that would normally have your business at this time of year or by seeking out people in need in your extended network.

“From the first week [of the JLC’s social media campaigns], we had a very generous member of the show-horse community sponsor a whole program of 10+ horses for a month,” says Cushing. “Their barn does not have a lesson program, but they were inspired to help. The ‘Feed Your Favorite Lesson Horse’ campaign helped them find a barn in need and a way to support our community through these challenging times.

“Every day we were getting tagged in photos of barns whose clients, friends, and peers stepped up to send the whole barn lunch and help keep spirits up,” Cushing continues. “It has also been humbling to see barns and industry vendors find creative ways to give back to the JLC Horsemen’s Relief Fund through hosting fundraisers or donating part of their proceeds from sales to our grant program.”

by Leslie Potter/US Equestrian Communications Department

Kaley Cuoco Makes a Big Bang to Connect the Equestrian Community

American actress and avid equestrian Kaley Cuoco is the voice of the FEI’s latest digital campaign, sharing her enthusiasm, passion, and love for the sport that has been at the core of the Olympic Movement for over a century.

#ForTheLoveOfEquestrian has launched with an exclusive heart-warming video narrated by the actress, who has been riding since she was a teenager.

“Why do we do it? Because it’s the greatest feeling in the world. Because it’s a partnership like no other. We do it for the love. The love of this life. #ForTheLoveOfEquestrian”

The campaign, scheduled to run over the summer, features incredible stories of passion, commitment, and pride from elite athletes and their teams, to everyday riders, embracing the dedication and courage that underpins equestrian sport and its surrounding lifestyle.

“We made it our priority to engage with our community and have created a new digital campaign to celebrate all the positives that make our sport unique,” FEI Commercial Director Ralph Straus said.

“We are a global sport, but we are also a way of life. Equestrian events not only provide thrilling action for fans and spectators around the world, but equestrian sport is all about the connection and, whether we can be together or not, we wanted to make sure that with the launch of this campaign, we are helping to fill the void created by the lack of live sport during this difficult time.”

To learn more about #ForTheLoveOfEquestrian, join the community conversation, view and share inspiring stories on the FEI YouTube channel, and engage with the FEI on Facebook and Instagram.

With no live action currently being broadcast, the FEI is putting the sport back centre stage with an all-new, six-part series, Icons. Delving into the archives to relive some of the most exciting and heart-stopping moments from FEI Championships and Series of days gone by, Icons looks back at the careers of some of the most successful and influential equestrian athletes of recent times.

Each 26-minute episode focuses on a specific athlete, including household names such as three-time FEI Dressage World Cup™ winner and six-time Olympic gold medalist Germany’s Isabell Werth and compatriot and five-time Olympian and reigning European Eventing champion Ingrid Klimke.

Also featuring are Charlotte Dujardin CBE, the most successful British Dressage athlete in the history of the sport with Olympic, FEI World Cup™, World, and European Championships titles to her name, Swiss Olympian and current European Jumping champion Martin Fuchs, two-time Olympic silver medalist and twice Sweden’s Sports Personality of the Year Peder Fredricson, and Australian Driving legend Boyd Exell, five-time world champion and with five FEI World Cup™ Final wins to his credit.

Icons, which launches Friday 29 May, puts the spotlight on those career-defining moments that make these athletes such superheroes! Watch live and free every week on FEI.TV.

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Your Southern Source for Everything Horse