Longines Masters de Lausanne Is Back in the World’s Capital of Sport

The rebirth of Lausanne International Jumping last year at the initiative of EEM World, organizer of the prestigious Longines Masters World Series (Hong Kong, Lausanne, Paris), had caused quite a stir. In the idyllic setting of Place Bellerive, in the heart of the world’s capital of sport, the stars of international show jumping and the best in entertainment are once again meeting on the shores of Lake Leman, from 18 to 21 June 2020, for the second edition of the Longines Masters of Lausanne.

Created by EEM World with Longines as Title Partner, Official Timekeeper, and Official Watch, the Longines Masters series unquestionably stands out from other competitions on the international show jumping circuit. “I have always wanted to promote equestrian sports and make them known to as many people as possible with the exceptional values they represent,” explained Christophe Ameeuw, EEM World CEO and Founder. “It was then necessary to stage the sport, to make it spectacular, readable, understandable, exciting. In one word: open it up.”

This opening-up means a change in formats and adapting, as has happened in all other sports. The spectators at the Longines Masters of Lausanne will discover the rhythmic, often exclusive events that have made the event a world success for more than ten years. These include the Masters Power on Saturday noon, a puissance or high jump competition (the final jump horse and rider pairs will be 2.05m!), the famous Longines Speed Challenge on Saturday evening, known as the fastest event in the world, and the Longines Grand Prix on Sunday afternoon, which is undoubtedly the highlight of any Longines Masters.

A total of eighteen other events will take place in front of Lake Leman: there are events reserved for amateurs (but also for international professional riders riding aspiring horses) and Swiss national riders, and of course other events dedicated to the stars of the discipline. Last year, for its first edition, the Longines Masters of Lausanne attracted the biggest names: the then World No. 1 (who still is today), the Swiss Steve Guerdat, his young compatriot Bryan Balsiger, winner of the Longines FEI World Cup in Oslo (last October), and the French champions Pénélope Leprévost and Philippe Rozier, for example, stepped up to the start of the Longines Grand Prix.

The show… around the arena as well

Since its launch last year, and like every event in the world series, the Longines Masters of Lausanne has shaken up show jumping competitions by placing as much importance on the top-level sport in the arena, as the entertainment offered around it.

Totally free and accessible to all, and in its ideal location at the heart of the event, the Prestige Village offers a wide range of activities for children (signing sessions, large drawing wall, make-up workshops or even making paper horse hobbies). It offers the opportunity to discover horse riding with your family thanks to an unobstructed view of the paddock where the world’s greatest horsemen and women warm up before the events. Pop-up stores selling partner brands in the fields of luxury, fashion, horse riding, gastronomy, wines, and champagne make the Prestige Village the ideal place to stroll in an idyllic setting.

At the end of the day, visitors can enjoy fine cuisine in one of the Prestige Village restaurants, or have a nightcap with friends while enjoying musical performances on Friday evening. Worthy of note: the comeback of Spanish star Santi Serra! Six horses, two dogs, two falcons, and an eagle make up the team accompanying the Catalan rider during his performances in the Longines Masters of Lausanne arena. The showman relies on communication to let his horses wander in complete freedom and complicity. Each of Santi’s shows is an enchanting diversion, and an unforgettable moment of grace and humor.

The second edition of the Longines Masters of Lausanne, in the heart of the world’s capital of sport, in the enchanting setting of the shores of Lake Leman, will be held from 18 to 21 June 2020. The ticketing for stand seats (the rest are completely free) will open on the next few days.

Press Contact – Blizko Communication
Daniel Koroloff – E-mail: daniel@blizko-communication.com
Juliette Feytout – E-mail: juliette@blizko-communication.com

Apply Now for the USPEA Jonathan Wentz Memorial Grants

The Jonathan Wentz Memorial (JWM) Competition Grants were established to continue the dream of Paralympian Jonathan Wentz; to advance Para Dressage in the USA by supporting and encouraging Para Dressage Youth, Adult & Veteran athletes to set the goal of National and International competition.

At age 13 Jonathan set the goal of riding for the USA in the Paralympics. At age 16 he established a plan and budget to achieve his dream. In 2012, at the age of 21, Jonathan was able to achieve his dream of riding for Team USA in the 2012 London Paralympics, earning the highest placing of all U.S. equestrians that competed in London.

Jonathan saw the need to develop a pathway for Para Dressage Emerging athletes in order to help grow and improve Para Dressage in the USA. The Jonathan Wentz Memorial Grants were developed to help offset the expense of participating in National and International competitions to encourage the growth of USA Para Dressage. Download the grant application here.

Grant #1 The JWM Emerging Athlete National Competition Grant

The JMW Emerging Athlete National Grant is intended for Emerging Para Dressage Youth, Adult & Veteran athletes, ages 12 within the competition year through adults who are actively competing in National Para Dressage competitions at USDF/USEF Licensed competitions.

The JMW Emerging Athlete National Grant is intended to be used to help offset the expense of participating in National competitions. Grant reimbursement may include entry and stabling fees, trainer fees, and/or horse transportation,

Grants of $250 may be awarded for up to two USDF/USEF competition per calendar year, showing in FEI Para Dressage Test of Choice classes. Grants are subject to the approval of the USPEA board and availability of funding.

Guidelines for Application of The JWM Emerging Athlete National Competition Grant:

  1. Athletes must be an active member of USPEA.
  2. Must have a current USEF National Classification with a confirmed Grade or Review Set Date Status.
  3. Athletes must be age 12 or older within the competition year.
  4. Grant is to offset expense of entering and competing in a USDF/USEF Licensed competition in FEI Para Dressage TEST OF CHOICE classes.
  5. Athletes must submit a Jonathan Wentz Memorial Competition Grant Application (page 1) with expenses itemized, along with a copy of completed entry forms, invoices, and/or receipts for consideration of grants. Grants are intended for direct payment of specific competition expenditures, entry fees, stabling, and/or horse transport only. Checks made out to athlete or immediate family for reimbursement will require a completed W-9 and will be subject to approval.
  6. Athlete may only apply for one grant at a time (maximum two (2) Grant #1 per calendar year, six grants maximum lifetime).

Note: Athletes may only receive this grant a maximum of six times. Athletes who have achieved a 62% or higher in the Team, Individual, or Freestyle test at a CPEDI3* are not eligible for Grant #1.

Grant #2 The JMW Young Athletes International Competition Grant

The JMW Young Athletes International Competition Grant is intended for assisting USA Para Dressage Young Athletes (ages 16-21 within the competition year), who are eligible to compete in CPEDI 1-3* International Para Dressage competitions and have not yet achieved a 62% or above in the Team or Individual FEI Para Dressage tests at a CPEDI3*.

The JWM Young Athletes International Competition Grant is intended to be used to help offset the expense of participating in International (CPEDI) competitions. Grant reimbursement may include entry and stabling fees, trainer fees, and/or horse transportation.

Grants may be awarded up to $1,000.00 for the athletes competing in a CPEDI competition. Grant amount will be based on horse transport mileage. (> 500 miles = $500.00; > 750 miles = $750.00; > 1,000 miles = $1,000.00 max. Miles noted are based on one way.)

Grants may be awarded for a maximum of one CPEDI event per competition year with a maximum of $1,000.00 awarded per competition. Grants are subject to the approval of the USPEA board and availability of funding.

Guidelines for Application of The JWM Young Athletes International Competition Grant:

  1. Athletes must be an active member of USPEA (membership at uspea.org).
  2. Athletes must be 16-21 years old within the competition year.
  3. Athletes must have a USEF National Classification or FEI International Classification with an assigned Grade with the status of Confirmed or Review Set Date. A FEI Classification is mandatory for participation in a FEI CPEDI.
  4. Athlete must have received a minimum score of 64% in the past 6 months at a USDF/USEF Licensed show or through USPEA Video Judging in the Novice A & B test for a CPEDI 1 & 2*; and in the Team, Individual, and Freestyle test for a CPEDI3*. Tests must be in the athlete’s classified grade.
  5. Grant is intended to offset the expense of entering and competing in an FEI CPEDI.
  6. Athletes must submit a Jonathan Wentz Memorial Competition Grant Application (page 1) with expenses itemized, along with a copy of completed entry forms, invoices, and/or receipts for consideration of grants. Grants are intended for direct payment of specific competition expenditures, entry fees, stabling, and/or horse transport only. Checks made out to athlete or immediate family for reimbursement will require a completed W-9 and will be subject to approval.
  7. Athlete may only apply for one grant at a time (maximum one (1) Grant #2 per calendar year, 2 grants maximum lifetime).

Note: Athletes may only receive this grant a maximum of two times. Athletes who have achieved a 62% or higher in the Team, Individual, or Freestyle test at a CPEDI3* are not eligible for Grant #2.

Both Grants are subject to the approval of the USPEA board and the availability of funds. Athletes may only apply for one Grant at a time.

Download the grant application here.

For more information about the USPEA, please visit www.USPEA.org.

Steffen Peters and Suppenkasper Lead a Record-Breaking Sweep in Week Seven of AGDF

Steffen Peters on Suppenkasper. ©️Susan Stickle.

Wellington, FL – February 22, 2020 – Steffen Peters (USA) threw his hands in the air as his winning score of 77.106% was announced in the FEI Grand Prix Special CDI5*, presented by Palm Beach Equine Clinic. He was last to go in the class of 11 starters in the five-star week seven of the 2020 Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) in Wellington, Florida.

Peters’ score represented a new personal best in this test, and his delight with Suppenkasper, Four Winds Farm’s 12-year-old gelding, was evident as he punched the air. Canada’s Brittany Fraser-Beaulieu rode All In to a new personal best score of 73.447% in this test to finish second, with Sabine Schut-Kery (USA) finishing third on Sanceo with 72.979%.

Despite a mistake in the middle of the one-time changes on the diagonal, this was the first time Peters had broken the 77% barrier and repays the faith he has had in this giant and extraordinarily athletic horse.

“He’s been at 76% for some time,” said a delighted Peters. “I knew there’s a 77% in there and we’re slowly and consistently creeping up, so without the mistake it would have been even higher. It’s so very exciting to see ‘Mopsie’ getting a 77%.

“It felt really good for him to still after four shows have this energy,” added Peters, who is based in California. “The horse has so much go, it’s incredible. I didn’t push him for one single extension; in fact, I was still holding back a little bit.”

The test was fault-free apart from a blip in the middle of the diagonal of one-time changes.

“He’s done six tests without a mistake, so today he was allowed one and I’m not sure it was his mistake; there is always the rider involved too. To be honest, I just did not feel comfortable with the way my underwear was sitting so when I came in, that’s what I was thinking about. Thank god it didn’t cause me more trouble than just a missed one-tempi.”

Watch Steffen Peters’ winning test here. Courtesy of Richard’s Equine Video.

Both Peters and Schut-Kery have been training with Debbie McDonald while in Wellington, and the legendary trainer identified what went wrong for Peters in the flying changes right away.

“Debbie said she thought that before the one-tempis, I rode him just a little too forward on the short side to get a bit more energy and ride the one-tempis with risk,” explained Peters, who was on the bronze-medal winning USA team at the Rio Olympics in 2016. “She’s absolutely right that I didn’t need to do that.”

For more information and results, visit www.globaldressagefestival.com.

Dazzling Dufour and Cassidy Triumph Again in Gothenburg

Cathrine Dufour and Atterupgaards Cassidy. (FEI/Satu Pirinen)

Not for the first time, Denmark’s Cathrine Dufour and her mighty little chestnut gelding Atterupgaards Cassidy stole Swedish hearts when winning the tenth leg of the FEI Dressage World Cup™ 2019/2020 Western European League at the Scandinavium Arena in Gothenburg (SWE).

The Danish pair has a particular affinity with this city, taking bronze here in both the Grand Prix Special and Freestyle at the FEI European Championships staged in 2017 and then returning to win the FEI Dressage World Cup™ qualifier in 2018.  And they were unbeatable once more, despite a shaky start in the Grand Prix in which they had to settle for third place after a nasty stumble in their first extended trot and an error of course at the end of their test.

“I’ve had him 10 years now and he’s really special for me and my family. I think I owe this horse everything – he kind of created my career and I am really truly enjoying every time I ride down the centreline, because he’s 17 years old and you never know what happens. He feels great and is super-sound, but you just have remember to enjoy every single ride!” Dufour said after pinning Germany’s Benjamin Werndl and Frederic Wandres into third.

Sweden’s Paulinda Friberg and Di Lapponia T kicked off the action after the half-time break with a new leading mark of 74.145, but Wandres soared out in front when posting 81.465 with Duke of Britain for a test that oozed power and pizzazz. Their coordination with their musical score was superb.

“We used this music for the first time at London Olympia at Christmas and it was good; today is only the second time we do it, and when the crowd started clapping on the last line I knew it was not too bad again!” said the rider who finished his performance with extravagant one-handed passage to the delight of the spectators.

Great Britain’s Charlotte Fry and Dark Legend, who posted a personal-best when claiming runner-up spot in the Grand Prix, also produced some fabulous passage on their way to a mark of 81.030, but then Dufour blew the whole competition wide open. Cassidy sparkled as they collected 9s for extended trot and 10s for canter pirouette, and when 87.860 went up on the board that was always going to be tough to beat.

The penultimate partnership of Sandra Dahlin and Ichi have been making the headlines all week because this is a horse that comes with a fascinating story. The Dahlin family won Ichi’s mother in a raffle at Gothenburg Horse Show 17 years ago, and the 14-year-old mare has done them proud. As Show Director, Tomas Torgersen, said, some new riders who have been given an opportunity to compete at Gothenburg Horse Show this year and they have blossomed. Dahlin is one of those, showing tremendous talent when steering her mare into fifth place in only the fourth international outing of their career together.

Last man in was Benjamin Werndl, and the crowd watched intently as he consistently racked up strong scores with Daily Mirror, but when 86.170 went up on the board he had to settle for second place behind Dufour. He was far from disappointed; in fact he said he was “super happy” because this week he has made a breakthrough in piaffe which has sometimes been problematic with this horse. “I’m looking forward to the next competitions now. I always said he’s the best horse I ever sat on; the only thing was the piaffe could be better, but if he does it like he did today, then who knows what can happen!”

With just one more Western European League qualifier left to run, in ’s-Hertogenbosch (NED) in three weeks’ time, many of the riders are thinking ahead to the FEI Dressage World Cup™ Final in Las Vegas (USA) in April. Dufour explained that she won’t compete there as she is aiming both Cassidy and her younger horse Bohemian, who topped the opening leg of the WEL series on home ground in Herning (DEN) last October, at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

But both runner-up Werndl and third-placed Wandres have it clearly in their sights – if they get the opportunity. “I’d like to go to both Vegas and Tokyo! I have two horses so I will have to discuss with our national trainers. If I go to Vegas I will go with Famoso,” Werndl said.

But as Wandres explained it’s not just as easy as that. As it stands, German riders hold the top four places on the WEL leaderboard of which just two will be permitted to join their compatriot and defending champion, Isabell Werth, in the battle for the 2020 title. Top of the table ahead of the 11th and last leg is Jessica von Bredow Werndl, followed by her brother Benjamin Werndl, then Wandres, and in fourth is Helen Langehanenberg.

“I’m proud to be German but sometimes it’s not so easy in the dressage ring to be a German rider because there’s always a big fight for the three spots for the World Cup Final. And there’s one more show in March so everything is still open and we have to fight until the end. But if I have a chance to go for sure I will take it because it’s a dream for me, especially with this horse. We came into the Grand Prix sport together and this would be something special!” — Frederic Wandres (GER)

Result here.

By Louise Parkes

Media contact:

Shannon Gibbons
Media Relations and Communications Manager
shannon.gibbons@fei.org
+41 78 750 61 46

Bertram Allen Continues Winning Ways during WEF Seven

Bertram Allen and Lafayette van Overis. Photo © Sportfot.

Wellington, FL – February 21, 2020 – Ireland’s Bertram Allen continued a successful debut season at the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) in Wellington, FL with a victory in the $37,000 Bainbridge Companies 1.45m CSI5* riding Lafayette van Overis on Friday, February 21.

Friday’s one-round, featured event built by course designer Santiago Varela (ESP) saw 67 riders compete for the win, but none could best Allen and the foot speed of his nine-year-old Belgian Warmblood gelding (Kashmir van Schuttershof x Tauber van het Kapelhof), owned by Ballywalter Stables.

Stopping the clock at 63.61 seconds, Allen and Lafayette van Overis, a horse he got the ride on in August of 2019, handily won with almost two seconds to spare.

“He’s incredibly straight forward,” said Allen, who took over the ride on Lafayette van Overis from Great Britain’s Joe Clee. “I feel like he truly understands what we are trying to do out there. Ever since I got him, he has been impressing me. He wasn’t bought to be the best horse in the world or to jump 5* grand prix, but every question he’s asked he does it with ease and is very competitive.”

Schatt and Iwasaki Are Victorious in the $10,000 USHJA National Hunter Derby

The $10,000 USHJA National Hunter Derby took place on Friday morning during week seven of the Winter Equestrian Festival. The derby was held on “Pony Island,” where Rings 11 and 12 were combined to create a larger field. The class had a junior/amateur section, as well as a professional division, and offered $10,000 in prize money to both. There were 38 junior/amateur riders and 34 professionals to complete the first round with 12 riders coming back for the handy round in each section.

Havens Schatt aboard Highlander captured the victory in the professional division, and Augusta Iwasaki rode Sambuca to the top spot in the junior/amateur section.

“Going into the handy, since he is a very big horse, I was curious to see if I could really do the inside turns,” Schatt explained. “Actually, going to the first jump, I was like ‘Am I going to turn inside or am I not?’ But when I decided to try it; he did that one so well and the others amazing.”

Taking top honors in the junior/amateur section was Augusta Iwasaki riding Sambuca.

“I thought it was a super fun course. I had a great time on both of my horses,” Iwasaki commented.

Iwasaki catch rode the 16-year-old Belgian Warmblood gelding (Lambada Van Berkenbrobeck x Viola) for her friend Ava Peck. The pair got the highest handy round score in the junior/amateur section of the class.

For full results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

Katherine Bateson Chandler Does the Double in Five-Star Week Seven of AGDF

Katherine Bateson Chandler and Alcazar. ©️Susan Stickle.

Wellington, FL – February 21, 2020 – Katherine Bateson Chandler (USA) made it two wins from two starts in week seven of the 2020 Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF) at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) in Wellington, Florida. Last to go on a blustery and unseasonably cold night under lights, Bateson Chandler and her faithful partner Alcazar won the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle CDI5*, presented by CaptiveOne Advisors, putting 76.105% on the board.

The Dominican Republic’s Yvonne Losos De Muñiz danced her way to a 75.115% second place riding her bouncy bay mare Aquamarijn, a 15-year-old by United. Juan Matute Guimon (ESP) improved one place from his finish in the qualifying grand prix to round out the podium aboard his father Juan Matute Sr’s Don Diego to 72.76%, despite a challenging ride in the windy conditions.

Bateson Chandler was a groom for Robert Dover for 16 years and is now aiming to catch the eye of selectors for a place on the USA team for the Tokyo Olympics with Jane Forbes Clark’s Contango gelding. She said: “Yesterday, I don’t think I’ve ever been that hot before, and today I don’t think I’ve ever come out of a test still being cold. We had the most extreme differences. I’ve ridden in very cold weather, and I’ve ridden in very hot weather, but not usually in the same show. So for the horses, it was challenging.

“I’m really happy because two or three years ago, my horse used to have a real issue with anything that moved – he’s a little bit of a spook that way. He went in there and didn’t look at anything and won the class,” added Bateson Chandler, who rode to a Tom Hunt compilation with a high degree of difficulty.

Watch Katherine Bateson Chandler’s winning test here. Courtesy of Richard’s Equine Video.

“Tonight was the first time that I’ve actually done my floorplan to my music correctly and not been behind or ahead. I do a double pirouette and then a one-and-a-half pirouette. In Olympia, I did a double and then a double, and then I was facing the wrong way, so I’ve had some issues with that.”

Bateson Chandler travels to the UK to train with Carl Hester every summer, and with his help she continues to get the best out of 15-year-old ‘Lonsie’, who has been competing at international grand prix for half a decade and survived a colic operation in the summer of 2016 while in Germany. They are now unbeaten in their last four starts.

For more information and results, visit www.globaldressagefestival.com.

What Makes a Wild Horse Wild?

By Ginger Kathrens

In 1994 I saw my first wild horses in the Pryor Mountains of Montana. A black stallion was eating snow at the base of a red butte. When he noticed my sister who had on a bright white golf jacket, he pranced toward her and snorted. His mares, yearling, and newborn foal responded to his warning, dashing from the shadows of the butte to the safety of nearby hills.

Captivated by the striking stallion named Raven and the spectacular wild horse range they call home; I began documenting their lives in the wild. On May 29, 1995 they brought their newborn colt out of the forest right in front of my camera. I named him Cloud and his life is the subject of three PBS Nature series documentaries.

The assertion that same sex herds of horses in captivity are the equivalent of wild horse families in the wild is ludicrous. A single-sex group of geldings or mares in a pasture bears no resemblance to the intricate and dynamic society of a wild horse herd.

In the wild, the horses make all the decisions, decisions that often make the difference between life and death. Where to go when a storm comes, where to find water in a drought, when to run and when to stand their ground — these are decisions shared by the band stallion and often a strong lead mare. Cloud was lucky to have Sitka for a time, a strong female who could even tell the powerful and impetuous Cloud where to go and when.

I documented Cloud from the day he was born to the time, 20 years later, when he disappeared. His body was never found, but that is not unusual. Many wild horses decide to isolate themselves at the end of their lives. And this is an important word to remember: decide.

Mustangs in captivity do not have the ability to decide much of anything. They are fed, they are restrained in pastures or dirt paddocks, and they are in a same-sex herd of all geldings (castrated males) or all mares.

The horses on my small Colorado ranch have more of a society than any same-sex herd in a BLM corral or sanctuary.  Flint is the leader of my little band which includes Cloud’s birth sisters Mahogany (Flint’s lead mare) and Smokey. The other four geldings, Sky, Sax (Cloud’s youngest brother), BJ, and Swasey, take their lead from Flint and, to a lesser extent, Mahogany. But I would never pretend that they have the social intricacies or intense behaviors of a real wild horse family.

Wild horse social structure is complex and fascinating. It is essential to their survival in the wild. In many ways wild horses are like wolves. There is a dominant male, often a powerful female, and there are subordinate members of the family, including other females. Young males are asked to leave the family by their fathers, and young females get a wandering eye around two years of age. Only bachelor stallions that are skilled fighters and have a strong desire to procreate can win and keep mares.

It is disingenuous of BLM – and others seeking to rid the range of these magnificent animals – to tell the public they can see “wild horses” in “public off-range pastures.” None of the captivating natural behaviors just described are seen among geldings or mares in a man-made, fenced environment.

What the public is seeing are human-influenced, same-sex pastured horses, who bear little resemblance to their friends and families still lucky enough to be running wild and free on our open ranges.

The Cloud Foundation
107 South 7th St
Colorado Springs, CO 80905
www.thecloudfoundation.org

The Horse Capital Parade

For our friends in Florida, an amazing experience with horses is coming soon: the Horse Capital Parade!

Where: Downtown Square Ocala, Florida, the surrounding streets and at the Downtown Market.
March 7, 2020 at 1:00pm – 6:00pm

A vendor village will open at 1pm on the Downtown Square with a beer and wine garden, great vendors, horse breed meet-and-greets, and at 4:30pm, an incredible horse breed parade, the speedy Historic Stagecoach, and the grand finale with the Budweiser Clydesdales. Watch them harness the Clydesdales at 2pm at the Downtown Market. There are also wonderful restaurants with outdoor dining where you can watch the parade.

Gentle Carousel Miniature Therapy Horses
www.Horse-Therapy.org
www.facebook.com/TherapyHorses

Tynan Trounces Field in Turf Tour Week 7’s $5,000 1.30m Rising Star Classic

Willie Tynan and Ballinteskin Joe.

Wellington, FL (February 21, 2020) – Ireland’s Willie Tynan remains a force to be reckoned with on the 2020 Turf Tour, and is on the road to potentially recapture his 2019 title of Turf Tour Leading Rider. Wednesday’s $5,000 1.30m Rising Star Classic was set against the emerald green grass of The Ridge at Wellington’s home farm, where the field was recently expanded and enhanced to accommodate Turf Tour competitors. Over courses designed by Eric Hasbrouck on both grass and sand, competitors jumped the brightly colored jumps at heights ranging from .80m to 1.30m during Wednesday’s show, with Friday promising the same competition with the addition of the $15,000 1.40m Turf Tour Grand Prix. The Turf Tour’s 2020 Leading Rider based on collective points from the Rising Star, Grand Prix, and 1.20m divisions will once again be awarded a tricked-out golf cart courtesy of Iron Horse Transit.

With only three double clears in the class of 15 riders, Tynan’s 40.867 second jump off time with the always fast Freya put him squarely in the lead. A new horse for Tynan, Ballinteskin Joe, showed impressive scope and talent to also go double clear, jumping off in 43.694 for second place. Both Freya and Joe are owed by Michelle Guardino-Dettelbach from Delray Beach, Florida. Wednesday’s third and final double clear in the Rising Star went to another Irishman and Turf Tour regular, Jordan Coyle, aboard Elan Farm’s Bold Prinz. The pair’s jump off time of 47.259 settled them into third.

For full results, visit www.HorseShowing.com.

For full schedules and prizelists, visit www.RidgeShowJumping.com.

Martin Fuchs Flies to Win in $137,000 WEF Challenge Cup Round 7

Martin Fuchs and Stalando 2. Photo © Sportfot.

Wellington, FL – February 20, 2020 – Swiss rider Martin Fuchs showed why he is ranked number two in the world with a win aboard Stalando 2 in Thursday’s $137,000 Equinimity WEF Challenge Cup Round 7 CSI5* at the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) in Wellington, FL.

Fuchs and Stalando 2 were one of 49 entries to contest Thursday’s featured class, and the duo was one of 13 combinations to jump the first-round track without fault to qualify for Spain’s Santiago Varela-designed short course.

When Fuchs entered the ring as the penultimate rider, the time to beat had been set at 40.75 seconds by Great Britain’s Amanda Derbyshire and Luibanta BH, owned by Gochman Sport Horses LLC.

With his spot in the order on his side and with strides left out throughout the course aboard Stalando 2, Fuchs shot straight to the top of the leaderboard with a double-clear time of 40.69 seconds.

“I watched all the riders before me,” said Fuchs. “I planned to do a stride fewer from one to two, which I did, and then also through the double, I saw Daniel Bluman leave out a stride. I tried to do the same as he did. Everything worked out very well. To the last fence, I pulled once and it scared me a bit that I wouldn’t have the time! I’m very happy with this.”

John French Pilots Babylon to Top Honors in Pre-Green 3- and 4-Year-Old Hunters

The Rost Ring began on Thursday morning of week seven with the Pre-Green 3- and 4-Year-Old Hunter division. John French rode Babylon to the championship after winning three blue ribbons in the division.

Babylon arrived in the United States from Europe in December, and French began riding and working with the horse in January. The four-year-old Oldenburg gelding (Crumbie x Die Cera) is owned by Kent Farrington LLC. French, of San Juan Bautista, CA, has shown Babylon three times this year, and the duo has been champion every time.

“He has a great expression and is so careful up front. With all of his flash the judges are just drawn to him,” French commented. “I can just tell that one day he is going to be a famous junior or amateur-owner hunter.”

For full results, please visit www.PBIEC.com.

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