Kentucky Horse Shows COVID-19 Protocols

Lexington, Ky. – July 8, 2020 – Kentucky Horse Shows LLC would like to make all exhibitors who will be participating in the Kentucky Summer Horse Show and the Kentucky Summer Classic, to be held July 22 – August 2, 2020 at the Kentucky Horse Park aware of the COVID 19 Protocols, which can be viewed here.

Competition is just two weeks away and all exhibitors must be familiar with the protocols mandated by USEF and The Commonwealth of Kentucky under which these events will be conducted.

The requirements and suggestions outlined are carefully considered to allow athletes to compete safely. The protocols will be enforced uniformly. Any questions regarding the protocols should be emailed to hak@kentuckyhorseshows.com.

Please remember that at the end of the day it will be your cooperation that dictates the success of our return to competition.

For the 2020 show season, all Kentucky Horse Shows prize lists will only be available in digital format. For more information about the Kentucky Summer Series, please refer to the prize list on www.kentuckyhorseshows.com.

Ginger Discusses Nomination of Controversial Anti-Public Lands Candidate as BLM Director

Photo credit: BLM.

The nomination of William Perry Pendley as Director of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is rife with controversy and inconsistency. If this self-proclaimed “sagebrush rebel” has his way, we may no longer have federal public lands – making our wild horses and burros effectively homeless.

Pendley is well known for espousing the idea that our treasured public lands should be sold off. He has called man-made climate change “fiction” despite the ample support of scientific evidence and decried the origin of the Black Lives Matter movement as “a lie that spread like cancer.”

For the senators who now face the process of confirming Pendley’s nomination, the decision should be a simple one. If they represent the belief that public lands belong to every American, they must vote against Pendley. But, for the Republican-dominated Senate in our highly charged, politically-polarized nation, the decision is weighing heavily on some.

To watch Ginger’s take on Pendley’s nomination and what it could mean for our cherished wild herds, click here. Watch the video and then please take decisive action. It only takes a minute, and your impact may very well make history.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Creating the Channel of Energy, by Ruth Hogan Poulsen Dressage

Photo: Sue Weakley.

In Program Your Position, a program released in collaboration with Jane Savoie, we use key buzzwords to trigger the brain to become more self-aware while riding. We talk about the energy you create in your horse from your legs, and then how and where to channel or recycle the energy with your seat and reins.

The original Program Your Position drawing (above) shows how your aligned and square torso (head, shoulders, knees, and toes) should aim like laser beams to direct the energy of the horse (isn’t that a song?).

For example, let’s talk about shoulder-in. The shoulder-in is a lateral movement that is the foundation of all lateral work. Shoulder-in is performed on three tracks and has bend and flexion around the inside leg. The shoulders are displaced to the inside over the inside hind leg. The outer shoulder and fore leg should be placed over the inside hind leg to create three tracks. The hind legs in a shoulder-in should maintain their straight forward position along the original path.

OK. So how do we do THAT? Your shoulders and reins control the direction of your horse’s shoulders. Your hips and legs control the hips and hindquarters of the horse.

For this article, we are only going to talk about the rein aids, as I am using the shoulder-in as my example for the “laser” or “butt end of the whip” directions.

Your hands for a shoulder-in to the right:

  • Keep both hands low and equidistant from your body as you move them to the right.
  • Move them to the right enough to place the outside front leg in front of the inside hind leg.
  • Use your inside rein as an opening rein.
  • Bring your outside hand very close to the withers, but never let that hand cross over the withers.

The direction of the butt end of the whip is heading in the same direction as your arm and horse’s energy. So, if your whips are crossed, then there is an X or blocking of energy at that point. If you only point one whip where you want to go, the horse will fall out the other side.

Eduardo Menezes and Magnolia Mystic Rose Master $37k Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 3*

Eduardo Menezes and Magnolia Mystic Rose ©Sportfot.

Mill Spring, NC – July 2, 2020 – Eduardo Menezes (BRA) and Magnolia Mystic Rose put in a speedy 35.115 second jump-off round to take the win in Thursday’s $37,000 Horseware Ireland Welcome Stake CSI 3* at Tryon International Equestrian Center (TIEC). Jenni McAllister (USA) piloted Escada V S, a 2007 Swedish Warmblood mare (Escudo 19 x For Feeling) owned by Viksberg Sateri AB, to second on a time of 36.743 seconds, while Beezie Madden (USA) and Chic Hin D Hyrencourt, the Abigail Wexner-owned 2008 Belgian Warmblood gelding (Taran de la Pomme x Elanville), rounded out the podium on a time of 38.674 seconds.

Menezes and the 2008 Brazilian Sport Horse mare (Zirocco Blue VDL x Unknown) owned by RM Agronegocios Eireli, who have been partnered since the mare’s appearance in 2019’s Pan American Games in Lima, Peru, and have since collected solid placings together in Wellington, FL, were able to place themselves comfortably in the lead after speeding through the Oscar Soberon (MEX) designed track, he explained. “She’s a really good horse, and a fighter in the ring. You can always count on her!”

Kristen VanderVeen and Bull Run’s Faustino de Tili Blaze to $37,000 Wednesday Classic CSI 3* Win

Kristen VanderVeen grabbed both ends of the podium in the $37,000 Wednesday Classic CSI 3* with Bull Run’s Faustino de Tili and Bull Run’s Almighty on Wednesday in Tryon Stadium, sailing to a 36.005 second jump-off round to take first with “Frosty” and stopping the timers aboard “Almighty,” the 2008 Hanoverian gelding (Caspar x Quidam De Revel) owned by Bull Run Jumpers Six LLC, in 36.51 seconds for third place. Eduardo Menezes (BRA) and Ennebel Van Het Posthuijs, the 2009 Dutch Warmblood mare (Numero Uno x Argentinus) he co-owns with H5 Stables, claimed second place with a time of 36.127 seconds.

To learn more, visit www.Tryon.com.

Thierry Rozier, Always a Star in Grimaud

© Marco Villanti pour HUBSIDE JUMPING.

Already winner last week of the major event of the opening day of the CSI 4* of the HUBSIDE JUMPING, Thierry Rozier wins in the CSI 5* with Star. In this 1.50m event, he outstripped his French teammates, Mathieu Billot with Apache de Liam, then Simon Delestre (Chesall Zimequest) and Julien Anquetin (Blood Diamond du Pont) third.

“Thursday is my day (laughs)! The great thing about Star is that when we hit the track, we know we can try anything. I’m very lucky because she is naturally very fast and very respectful. I had a doubt on the penultimate line in which few riders had made six strides while advancing. But for the past two weekends, I have taken a lot of example on the routes of Simon Delestre and I since he was taking a stride in front of the double, so I knew I could take that risk. It worked well even if Simon resented me (laughs)! Star is really amazing! I try to take advantage of these good times in competition because the competition season is a bit complicated this year. Fortunately, we can count on organizers like Sadri Fegaier. He is at the origin of the major competitions currently in the world and everything is done for the comfort of the horses. I really want to thank Sadri for all he does for our sport. This weekend we also have a set of riders worthy of a championship! Winning in front of all these great riders is always a little something extra for me!”

Full results here.

For this first CSI 5* in the world since March, the course layout goes to the French track chief Cédric Longis, who takes command of a competition of this level for the first time. Three levels are still offered (CSI 1, 2, and 5*), for a total endowment of nearly 545,000.

All tests are transmitted live on https://grandprix.tv/fr.

The press kit can be downloaded here.

Daniel Koroloff – E-mail: daniel@blizko-communication.com

Fighting Back against BLM’s Nefarious, Brutal Plan for Wild Horses

TCF Founder and Director Ginger Kathrens recently teamed up with Charlotte Roe, retired diplomat and founder of the Wild Equid League of Colorado, on an Op Ed published in the Washington Examiner. It’s an article that exposes the truth about the BLM’s insidious plan for our last remaining wild horse and burro herds.

As Ginger said in a recent video, it’s time to speak truth to power. It’s time to bring these horrible plans to the awareness of the American people.

Please read and share this important article far and wide, so collectively we can raise our voices against BLM’s unjust actions and protect these iconic, beloved animals for generations to come.

The Cloud Foundation
www.thecloudfoundation.org

Inside the Rolex Grand Slam, Legend Edition: Nick Skelton

What was the first Major you competed in? How did you do?

Well, I first won the Grand Prix in Geneva in 1978; before it was a Rolex class [ndlr: Skelton won 9 Majors in total].

How did it feel to win your first Major?

As anybody would, it was incredibly exciting. I was very pleased and incredibly happy to be winning them. I had some very good horses in those days. Apollo won two Grands Prix at CHIO Aachen, and then I won the Aachen Grand Prix in 1982 with a horse called Everest If Ever. Lastly, Big Star won the Rolex Grand Prix in Aachen in 2013 when it was part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, so I became the Rolex live contender.

Is there a difference in feeling when you enter the arena of a Rolex Grand Prix at a Major, compared to other Shows?

CHIO Aachen was always a great place to ride; even back in the ’80s it was always packed with crowd; there was always a great atmosphere. Winning the Rolex Grand Prix in Aachen is an incredible feat for any rider to win. It’s probably one of the hardest ones to win, along with Calgary.

Which was your favourite Major to compete in?

I think probably every rider would agree with me in saying that CHIO Aachen is the best Major to compete in; it is like the Wimbledon of Show Jumping or like the Masters in golf; it is the pinnacle of the sport. I think most riders would say this.

Do you think it takes a special and unique type of horse to win one of the Majors that make up the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

Of course, they are big courses and there’s a lot of pressure with the big crowds of spectators that they attract. Riders also put a lot of pressure on themselves, as they are the most important Grands Prix to win.

How has the sport of Show Jumping changed throughout your career?

It’s changed a huge amount; one of the main things I notice now is the time allowed. Nowadays you have to jump the courses a lot quicker than you used to. I watched the video back recently, I think from 1987 when I won a Grand Prix with Apollo: the time allowed was 102 seconds; nowadays you’re in the same field with the same amount of fences, but the time allowed now ranges from 82 and 84 seconds. So, you need to be roughly twenty seconds quicker than what you needed to be all those years ago. The fences come at you quicker nowadays. There are often more fences in a modern course, despite the rings being so small; they now fit around 13 jumps into even the smallest rings. That is added pressure on the horses as they have to jump quicker and more obstacles than they did back in those days.

Would you say that it’s now more important to have a bigger string of horses, rather than one top horse?

Absolutely, there’s a lot more shows now, with a big Grand Prix happening every week somewhere in Europe. So, you need a lot more horses and the high-quality ones are difficult to find, and that’s why they’re expensive.

How did the introduction of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping enhance the sport?

It’s a very good concept; it’s incredibly difficult to win. I suppose back in the day I would have done it; I think I won those Grands Prix, some of them all in the same year. Scott Brash is the only rider to have done it; it is difficult to win two of those in a season, let alone three or four, so it’s an amazing accomplishment. I think overall, it’s made the sport more competitive, with riders striving to get to the pinnacle of Show Jumping, which is the Rolex Grand Slam.

You competed for so many years, did you still get nervous ahead of big competitions towards the end?

I don’t think I got nervous; all riders get a little bit apprehensive before an important ride because you want to do well. If somebody said that they didn’t feel anything, I’d say they were lying. Riders feel emotions because they want to do well. It’s more adrenaline than nervousness I’d say. I can only speak for myself, but once you start the course, I never noticed anything going on in the ring or anything going on around me. I suppose that’s synonymous with most athletes. I imagine when playing at Wimbledon, tennis players concentrate on what they’re doing and so can’t hear the crowd; it was the same for me.

You had some tough moments in your career – what gave you the drive to keep going?

I always had some young horses that were coming through, so during my injuries, it made me look forward to producing and developing that young horse, which made me want to come back stronger. I had Arko and then Big star, so I always had a couple of good young horses coming along that I thought were going to be good enough, which gave me the drive to come back. But I knew that after Big Star, that I was never going to find any horse that was going to be as good as him again, and also I was getting on a bit in terms of my age, and considering what I’d won up to that point, I knew it was the right time to hang my boots up, especially considering my back was playing up a bit and Big Star wasn’t as sound as he once was. The time was right.

I think we know the answer to this, but which horse was your horse of a lifetime?

Big Star, no doubt. I’ve been very lucky; I’ve had some great horses. It’s very difficult to decide which of them was better, but he was the outstanding one. I’ve had some incredible ones over my time, horses like Dollar Girl, St James, Apollo, Tinka’s boy, Top Gun, Carlo. Some of the best horses in the world at that time, but Big Star was an incredibly special horse, and I’m incredibly grateful to have ridden him.

When you first started riding Big Star, did you know that he was something special?

I knew; he was different gravy. There was something about him from the first ride. I knew he was different, that he was special.

What is Big Star up to now? Do you still jump him at home?

He goes to stud breeding, then he comes home; we try to keep him as fit as we can. We do a bit of jumping and hacking. He is spoilt and enjoying his retirement.

What parts of competing do you miss the most and least?

Winning is what I miss the most! I miss travelling the least, although I am still doing a fair amount of it with our students and Laura. I do miss taking part. Sometimes I’m watching, thinking to myself, “This is a big Grand Prix; wouldn’t it be nice to be out there competing?” But I was and am satisfied with what I accomplished throughout my career. I’m not the kind of person that looks back and has any regrets.

With new generations starting to climb the ranks in professional Show Jumping, e.g. Peter Charles’ son Harry – what is your advice to them?

The art of the game is picking the right horses, the ones that can take you to the top. You do have to be able to ride them though, but getting the best ones is the most important thing.

Which rider inspired you the most?

There are lots that have ridden and are still riding. I would say currently you could look at Scott Brash, Steve Guerdat, and the Philippaerts boys, but there are so many good riders out there nowadays that are all inspiring.

How have you kept the horses in training during lockdown?

We’ve just been doing it at home; we’ve built courses at home for the students and once a week we’ll pick a course and practice; it’s been quite entertaining and I’ve enjoyed it because I’ve never spent this much time at home, so the lockdown hasn’t been too big of a problem for me.

© 2020 Rolex – Rolex Grand Slam

Florida Gold Coast Quarter Horse Circuit Honored as Top Three Quarter Horse Show by AQHA

Canada’s Dr. Carole Joubert Gaboury and My Precious Gab competing in 2019. Photo: Cody Parmenter.

Tampa, Fla. – July 1, 2020 – The management team behind the Florida Gold Coast Quarter Horse Circuit is thrilled to announce that the record-breaking 2019 event has been awarded the coveted distinction as one of the top-three Quarter Horse shows in the nation, as ranked by the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA). Out of countless shows from across the world, the Florida Gold Coast Quarter Horse Circuit, the highest non-ranking cattle event, ranked third behind only the All American Quarter Horse Congress and the Arizona Sun Country Circuit, high-quality company for an event that has consistently made the top ten leaderboard for years under the direction and show management services of An Equine Production.

“We are so pleased to once again have these shows recognized as some of the best in the country by the AQHA. It truly takes a village to accomplish such a designation, and we have to thank our exhibitors, staff and supporters for all of their hard work and dedication. We are looking forward to an even greater event in 2020 and can’t wait to see everyone back in the show ring,” commented Kathy Avolt of An Equine Production.

Expanding even further in 2020, the event will include a whole host of new classes such as AQHA Ranch Trail, L2/L3 Amateur, Select and 14-18 Showmanship and Horsemanship. In addition, the 2020 Florida Gold Coast Quarter Horse Circuit will feature a series of amazing awards and parties, including a New Year’s Eve extravaganza. Save the date for Dec. 27-31, 2020, and then check flgoldcoastcircuit.com for schedules and forms when they become available in August.

For additional information on the Florida Gold Coast Quarter Horse Circuit, please visit flgoldcoastcircuit.com.

Remember Me Rose Named a Dam of Distinction

The 16-year-old mare Remember Me Rose is the newest AQHA Dam of Distinction.

The award recognizes the accomplishments of racing broodmares. To qualify for the award, a mare must meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Dams that produced two or more individual AQHA racing champions
  • Dams that produced at least three individual Grade 1 stakes winners
  • Dams that produced at least two foals ranked in the top 10 money earners of any particular year, as of December 31 of that year, and two G1 stakes winners
  • Dams that produced at least three foals that were in the top 10 money earners of any particular year, as of December 31 of that year.
  • When the award was created, a grandfather clause also allowed mares that had produced at least three individual stakes winners prior to 1983, and those wins were the equivalent of a G1-quality race, to be accepted.

Remember Me Rose, who is owned by champion breeder Dr. Steve Burns, earned the award by producing three individual Grade 1 stakes winners.

The mare was bred by Dr. Max and Linda Alumbaugh’s MLA International, was foaled in 2004 and was purchased as a yearling and raced by Azoom LP. She began her career in Mexico, but quickly came to the United States and finished second in the Rainbow Futurity (G1) and fifth in the All American Futurity (G1). She then won the AQHA Juvenile Challenge Championship (G2) and the Southwest Juvenile Championship, which was then ungraded, and capped the year with a win in the Sunland Winter Futurity (G2). The following year, she won the Ruidoso Derby (G1) and was second in both the Texas Classic Derby (G1) and Championship at Sunland Park (G1).

She retired in 2008 with nine wins from 18 starts and earnings of $820,895.

As a broodmare, she has to date produced 28 foals, of which 19 are starters and 15 are winners. They have earned more than $2.3 million.

Her three Grade 1 winners include Powerful Favorite, Runforyourlife, and most recently Cyber Monday, who won the Ruidoso Futurity (G1) on June 7. All three horses are sired by Favorite Cartel.

Remember Me Rose is sired by Corona Cartel and is out of the Zevi (TB) mare Im Moonlighting.

American Quarter Horse Association
1600 Quarter Horse Drive
Amarillo, TX 79104

Riders Come Back to Strzegom

Photo by Mariusz Chmieliński.

Strzegom, Poland, June 30: After weeks of uncertainty, Strzegom is starting the season of international eventing shows. The first competition will be Strzegom Summer Tour, which will be played out during two shows – on the first and third week of July.

Athletes from 13 countries will compete in international classes of various difficulty levels: CCI1*, CCI2*, CCI3*, and CCI4* this weekend with almost 140 horses.

Eventing, also called the equestrian triathlon, is one of the most difficult equestrian disciplines, where the horse and rider have to compete in three trials: dressage, cross-country, and jumping.

The show will start on Friday, when the athletes will present themselves in dressage tests. Saturday is jumping day, and the final exciting trials of XC and prizegiving ceremonies will take place on Sunday.

Due to sanitary restrictions, the event will take place without audiences and media. However, there will be a live streaming available for eventing fans on the official website of the show and Facebook: www.eventing.strzegomhorsetrials.pl.

Live video:

Saturday, 04.07.2020
12.00-18.00 – Showjumping

Sunday, 05.07.2020
09.00-15.00 – Cross-country

CCI Entries: http://www.eventing.strzegomhorsetrials.pl/images/2020/01/Entries_-_CCI_-_29.06.pdf

Programme: http://www.eventing.strzegomhorsetrials.pl/images/2020/01/Timetable_SST_-1st_week_-_26.06.pdf

Contact:
www.strzegomhorsetrials.pl
press@strzegomhorsetrials.pl

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